Wearable Lab episode 1: tech on display

Discover the Wearable Lab designers’exhibit, Hall 5 : 

An exhibit of 10 inspiring, experimental works –  featuring clothing and accessories – testifying to the  fast-moving developments in the Fashiontech scene over the past ten years:

Rainbow Winters, Thunderstorm dress, 2009 (England) : By integrating a sound-reactive sensor composed of electro-illuminated panels, this dress lights up as the volume surrounding it increases.

Ying Gao, Incertitudes, 2013  (Canada) :  With the help of a sound tracking system, the pins on the dress begin to detect the voice of the spectator. As the
movement of the pins continue, the spectator is engaged with the garments on a conversational level – a conversation filled with
inevitable uncertainty and doubt.

Ezra+Tuba, Butterfly dress, 2016 (Turkey), In partnership with Intel and Magic Flyer International : Butterfly Dress is one of the latest creations by the Turkish design duo Ezra + Tuba. This haute-couture dress is fashioned from a luxury jacquard fabric interwoven with metallic Lurex fibers and adorned with almost forty butterflies. The butterflies are
animated by electromechanical elements manufactured by hand and activated by Intel Edison, a computer module close by. With the help of proximity sensors, the dress is able to detect movement from 30 meters away. The butterflies begin to flap slowly, then faster as the person approaching gets closer, eventually taking full flight. The

 Anouk Wipprecht, Drinkbot dress, 2016 (Netherlands) : The latest artistic creation from Anouk Wipprecht is the Drinkbot Dress, a dress with a very particular expertise: one that
makes cocktails.

Nervous System, Tetra Kinematics 120n et Silver Orchid Necklace , 2013 et 2014 (USA) :  Silver Orchid Necklace is a piece of jewelry in silver, but created from a 3D printer. Its bilateral symmetry bears distinct characteristics to an orchid itself, and its complex patterns and perforations evoke the cellular structures of the flower. Tetra Kinematics 120n is composed of one-hundred and twenty unique tetrahedral parts. The studio is able to create complex and foldable shapes in strong, yet flexible nylon plastic. Through the technique of laser sintering (a type of 3D printing impression), this jewelry perfectly adapts to the body’s natural contours.

Pierre Renaux, collection Liquidation totale, 2013 (France) : The centerpiece of this collection, the 3D-printed shoes from iMaterialise, also evokes the idea of mutation by taking inspiration from osteoporosis, the bodily phenomenon that causes bones to lose their density: “I found it strangely sublime. The idea that with age, the very structure of a woman’s body is annihilated.”

 Sarah Angold, Kingla Com, Magic LingYu et Coronam, 2016 (England), in partnership withAvery Dennison : Presented for the first time in France, the high-tech jewelry of Sarah Angold strives to improve the relationship between the consumer and the product. The device includes an interactive mirror. This intelligent mirror detects the wearer of the accessory and oers them a multitude of interactions: a display of precise information on the origin and manufacture of the jewelry, insights on where and how the accessory was made, and even details on the collection itself and act of purchase.

Ezra + Tuba, Chameleon Effect, 2016 (Turquie) :  Chameleon Effect is a progressive bag created by Turkish designers Ezra + Tuba, exhibited here for the very first time. This bag’s special feature is the ability to transform in real time. Thanks to a simple application, downloadable on a smartphone, the owner of the bag can choose from a selection of twenty dierent colors and patterns alike. Printed with 3D technology and combined with an LCD screen, this bag fuses high-tech and haute-couture together. This gives us a glimpse into a future where
one can freely adapt their accessory to their mood, desires, and outfit.

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